What Is an Auto Insurance ID Card?

December 15, 2011 No Comments »


Hopefully you’re not asking this question because you were pulled over while driving uninsured!

Put simply, an “auto insurance ID card” is a document that demonstrates evidence of your current insurance coverage.

You will receive an auto insurance ID card for every covered vehicle on your policy. It is important to make sure you get the correct ID card in the correct glove box to ensure there are no problems when you need to show your evidence of insurance.

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For example, if you have two similar vehicles, or even the same make, be sure to get them in the right vehicles to avoid any fines if and when you’re pulled over. The VIN number should help you identify which is which.

What Information is on an Insurance ID Card?

While not every card is the same from every insurance company, you can expect AT LEAST the following information to be listed on an auto ID card:

1. The name of your car insurance company
2. The name of the insurance agency from which you purchased coverage
3. The effective date and the expiration date of your coverage
4. Your policy number
5. The named insured on the policy (sometimes other drivers on the policy are listed as well)
6. The VIN number of the vehicle that’s covered
7. The year, make and model of the covered vehicle

As discussed in item number “5” above, you may not always see every driver on your policy listed on an ID card. This is because car insurance coverage “follows” the vehicle rather than the person driving.

For example, you can allow a friend to operate your car (legally) without them having to be listed on the policy or the ID card.

When Do I Get My Auto ID Card?

You should receive a temporary card directly from your insurer or agent when you purchase coverage, followed by a permanent card, which arrives with your policy in the mail.

Unfortunately, not every insurer is able to provide you with instant proof of insurance when you purchase your policy. This may lead to your not being able to provide proof of coverage until your policy and ID cards arrive in the mail.

Some states have switched to an electronic database in order to keep up-to-the-minute coverage detail, which may make auto ID cards obsolete in the future. Read more about one example in Georgia.

Tip: Is car insurance required in every state?

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