Honda Accord Tops Most Stolen List

August 4, 2011 No Comments »


The National Insurance Crime Bureau released its “Hot Wheels” report this week, which details the “hottest cars” as reported by law enforcement each year.

By hot, we don’t mean a dented Corvette driven by Lance Burton. We’re talking stolen baby!

So without further ado, the most stolen vehicles in the nation during 2010 were:

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1. 1994 Honda Accord
2. 1995 Honda Civic
3. 1991 Toyota Camry
4. 1999 Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size)
5. 1997 Ford F150 Series/Pickup
6. 2004 Dodge Ram
7. 2000 Dodge Caravan
8. 1994 Acura Integra
9. 2002 Ford Explorer
10. 1999 Ford Taurus

Unsurprisingly, popular cars such as the Honda Accord and Civic, along with the Toyota Camry, topped the list.

There’s just a ton of these cars out on the roads, so it’s expected that a fair amount will be stolen.

This may also have to do with the fact that criminals know these models inside and out, so breaking in isn’t hard to do.

However, for the first time since 2002, thieves went for domestic brands as opposed to foreign, as Ford grabbed three of the top 10 spots, Dodge two, and Chevy one.

The good news is vehicle theft was down 7.2 percent from figures seen in 2009 and is now at its lowest level since 1967!

You can thank improved technology for that – most cars these days have some level of security, whether it be an alarm, an immobilizing device, or a tracking device, unlike some older models still on the road.

Where Does Car Insurance Come In?

We’re glad you asked. The report found that certain models of older cars and trucks were a popular choice for thieves because of the value of their parts.

But many of these older cars aren’t properly insured against theft.

You see, theft is only covered if you have comprehensive coverage, which is one half of physical damage coverage.

The other component is collision insurance coverage, which covers your vehicle in the event of a collision.

Physical damage coverage is optional, unless your lease your car and it is required by the loss payee.

Without “comp,” you’d be out of luck if your car were to be stolen. This is why you may want to think twice about dropping it, even if it’s an older car.

Of course, if the auto insurance deductible exceeds the value of your older car, it wouldn’t make sense to carry the coverage, as you wouldn’t see a dime from the insurance company.

[Should I buy collision insurance on an older car?]

For the record, regardless of how old or worthless your car is, you’re still required to carry at least the state minimum car insurance (liability-only car insurance).

This protects other drivers from your negligence, and is the “mandatory” component of car insurance.

If you’ve got questions about your auto insurance coverage, contact your insurance company or insurance agent to ensure you’re properly covered in the event of theft.

(photo: Rennett Stowe)

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